Randy Baumgardner

Republican Senate President Kevin Grantham has stripped Sen. Randy Baumgardner, R-Hot Sulphur Springs, from serving on any active Senate committees effective as of May 2. Grantham requested the change after workplace harassment allegations from nine people have been found credible by two outside investigators.

Rocky Mountain Community Radio’s Bente Birkeland has reported on sexual harassment at the State Capitol since November. This past week additional accusations against Senator Randy Baumgardner were found credible. Doubtful of another expulsion vote, Birkeland has made these reports public with the accusers’ consent. Last week, the Society of Professional Journalists named Bente the Colorado Journalist of the Year. Her coverage of allegations of sexual harassment at the Capitol also won a regional Edward R Murrow award for investigative reporting. KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh has more.

Senate leaders expect to meet soon to address next steps in possible punishments for Sen. Randy Baumgardner. Three independent investigations by two agencies have found allegations of sexual harassment against him at the Capitol credible.

Democrats are pushing for swift action. Baumgardner, a Hot Sulphur Springs Republican, survived an expulsion vote on April 2. That vote hinged on the findings of just one of the three investigations, which concluded that Baumgardner more likely than not grabbed and slapped a former legislative aide’s buttocks.  The two other investigations had not been finalized at the time of that vote. They were only released to the accusers last week. We made them fully available to the public on April 24 with the accusers’ consent.

Two accusers who filed workplace harassment complaints at Colorado’s Capitol against Sen. Randy Baumgardner are now releasing the full investigative findings to the public.

The investigations from Littleton Alternative Dispute Resolution Inc. found allegations that Baumgardner, a Republican from Hot Sulphur Springs, sexually harassed people and was inappropriate to be credible. In a story on Monday (April 23), we reported on some of the key findings, involving six additional people who brought allegations as a result of the investigation.

For the third time in state history, Colorado lawmakers voted on whether or not to expel one of their peers. The effort failed. In a battle over #MeToo, respectfulness, fairness and principles, Republicans defeated a Democratic resolution to oust Sen. Randy Baumgardner of Hot Sulphur Springs, despite an independent investigation that found allegations of sexual harassment against him credible.

The 17-17 vote went along party lines with one exception: Sen. Ray Scott, R-Grand Junction, voted for expulsion. Sen. Cheri Jahn, an unaffiliated member, voted with Republicans. Baumgardner abstained.

For the second time in a month, Colorado lawmakers are debating whether to eject one of their own amid allegations of sexual harassment. First, it was Steve Lebsock, the former Democratic representative, who was ousted overwhelmingly in the first House vote of its kind in more than a century. At this moment, in an unexpected move, the Senate is poised to begin similar proceedings over Randy Baumgardner, a Republican senator.

American Legislative Exchange Council

Documented Investigations has revealed that 15 Colorado legislators, including Senator Randy Baumgardner and Representative Bob Rankin, are members of the American Legislative Exchange Council. ALEC is a nonprofit organization of state legislators and private sector representatives who draft and share state-level legislation. Nonpartisan watchdog group Colorado Common Cause wants constituents to urge their elected officials to leave ALEC. KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh spoke with advocacy and media manager Caroline Fry to find out why.  

Sen. Randy Baumgardner, who is facing calls to resign in the wake of sexual harassment allegations, has been named in a new complaint at the state Capitol. The accuser, a man who worked as a non-partisan Senate staffer in 2016, alleges that Baumgardner created an offensive and hostile work environment.

Kevin Grantham, the president of Colorado's Senate, refused to say whether he would make any punishment stemming from a sexual harassment investigation -- public. He was asked Monday (Feb. 5, 2018) during a weekly media briefing with Capitol reporters whether he would commit to telling Coloradans any disciplinary action Sen. Randy Baumgardner would face. Baumgardner is the subject of a formal sexual harassment complaint.

“I can’t say one way or the other on that," Grantham said.

Last week, we broke the story that the complaint was considered credible by the independent group that spent two months investigating it. Leadership in the Senate will determine any disciplinary action, it could range from doing nothing, to a private apology or more training, to expulsion from the chamber. Expulsion requires a full vote of the sitting members of the chamber.

Colorado Senate Minority Leader Lucia Guzman said she does not want to be involved in any process that would determine potential disciplinary actions against Sen. Randy Baumgardner for sexual harassment. This follows a public effort by her fellow Democrats who urged in a letter that she be a part of that process.

A former legislative aide has filed a sexual harassment complaint against Republican state Sen. Randy Baumgardner for inappropriately touching her. 

The woman alleges that Baumgardner of Hot Sulphur Springs slapped and grabbed her buttocks about four times over a three month period during the 2016 legislative session when she worked at the State Capitol. She alleges that each incident happened inside the Capitol building during her workday, often while she was walking through a corridor next to the Senate Chamber. 

Here is part two of our interview with senate candidate Emily Tracy, focused on education, rural broadband and campaign finance.  Colorado’s General Assembly is made up of 65 House members and 35 Senators. Each state senator represents approximately 123,000 people for a term of four years. Carbondale and all of Garfield County are in Senate District 8, represented by State Senator Randy Baumgardner, a Republican. He is running for reelection but has ignored KDNK’s request for an interview. 


Colorado’s General Assembly is made up of 65 House members and 35 Senators. Each state senator represents approximately 123,000 people for a term of four years. Carbondale and all of Garfield County are in Senate District 8, represented by State Senator Randy Baumgardner, a Republican. He is running for reelection but has ignored KDNK’s request for an interview. Today you’ll hear from his opponent, Democrat Emily Tracy.