Climate Change

Local Youth Capture Climate Change on Film

Jun 15, 2018
Wild Rose Education

Local students are using film to explore personal interests around climate change. Wild Rose Education, in partnership with CU-Boulder climate scientists and Colorado Film School mentors, bring Lens on Climate Change to the Roaring Fork Valley. Megan Webber, with the Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program, has more. The community is invited to a screening of the five short films produced during the week at the Third Street Center on Saturday, June 16, at 2pm.

The Sopris Sun

Intern Laney Devers joins editor Will Grandbois and reporter Megan Tackett to talk about the latest edition of the Sopris Sun.

The effects of climate change are already being felt at the headwaters of the West’s most important river system, according to a study released earlier this year.

The Rocky Mountain Climate Organization compiled the latest science on climate change in the Colorado River headwaters in a report titled Climate Change in the Headwater: Water and Snow Impacts (PDF), presented to the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments in February.

AH Marsh photo

Close to 100 people attended the Colorado River District’s State of the Rivers meeting in Carbondale last week. The news wasn’t good but some locals are ready to change how they use water. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh reports.


Ed Mazria, world-renowned architect and CEO of the non-profit think tank, Architecture 2030, comes to Carbondale Friday for the Buildings for a Sustainable Future conference, presented by CLEER, CORE, and Garfield Clean Energy. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh spoke with him this week about his work.

Lara Whitley

Local students are rallying around climate change. Last week, youth activist Xiuhtezcatl Martinez visited four schools in the Roaring Fork Valley to initiate a social media challenge, sponsored by CORE and CLEER with support from the Town of Carbondale. KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh has more.

As the snowpack and moisture in the Colorado River Basin show large areas of moderate to extreme drought, some are wondering if the term “drought” is misleading people into thinking it’s a temporary situation. Do we need a new vocabulary to describe conditions in the West? H2O Radio reports.

AH Marsh Photo

 


Climate change and drought are taking a toll on pinyon pine and juniper woodlands, especially in the southwestern U.S.  Dr. Miranda Redmond, an assistant professor at Colorado State University, has researched this ecosystem. She is this week’s Naturalist Nights speaker and talked with KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh about the pinyon pine and why it’s disappearing. Dr. Miranda Redmond will be at Carbondale’s Third Street Center Wednesday at 5:30 PM.

Sunlight 2017 Opening: Second-Latest Since 1985

Dec 19, 2017
AH Marsh photo

Sunlight Mountain Resort, near Glenwood Springs, is scheduled to open on December 21st – the second-latest opening day for the resort since 1985. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh has this report about how the resort is weathering the lack of weather and whether this dry spell has long-term implications.

Jutta Strohmaier

Bob Berwyn, contributing writer for Pacific Standard, believes that science will save the world. KDNK's Raleigh Burleigh interviewed Bob about his reporting from the COP23 Climate Conference in Bonn, Germany.

Michaela Mujica-Steiner

CRMS graduate Michaela Mujica-Steiner returned from the 23rd UN Climate Conference in Bonn, Germany. Her youth delegation, SustainUS, interrupted the only official United States representation which focused on promoting fossil fuels and nuclear power.

Michaela Mujica-Steiner

 

CRMS graduate Michaela Mujica-Steiner is attending the 23rd UN Climate Conference, in Bonn Germany, with a youth delegation unofficially representing the United States. KDNK will be corresponding with Michaela throughout November with updates direct from COP23.

Wolf Perry, H20 Media, LTD.

The American pika are small, cute mammals that live in broken rock habitats or talus fields high in the mountains above treeline. Adorable as they are, these critters might have a serious story to tell about the impacts of climate change. Research is showing a correlation between the loss of ice and permafrost under the talus, and the disappearance of the animals. As temperatures rise, where pika live could indicate the health of a watershed—and foretell our future water supply. For H20 Radio, Frani Halperin and Jamie Sudler report.

Sandy Heierbacher

 

KDNK members are invited to the first of three community fora tomorrow night with environmental education specialist Sarah Johnson. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh spoke with Johnson to get the details. The Climate Choices forum runs from 7 to 9 pm Wednesday night here at the station. Registration is required by emailing Gavin@kdnk.org.

Bob Berwyn

 

For this week’s News Brief, News Director Raleigh Burleigh interviews environmental journalist Bob Berwyn on climate research. Berwyn’s photo essay, Mountains are Warming Twice as Fast as the Rest of the World, is available via Pacific Standard. His article about the Fraser River diversion is available at projectearth.us.

Deseret News photo


Federal agencies and county officials are concerned about fire danger. As the firecracker-packed July 4th holiday approaches, Stage One fire restrictions are in place. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh has this report. Click here for fire restriction details.

Chip Comins is the founder, director, and CEO of the American Renewable Energy Institute in Aspen, which has hosted ARE Day for 14 years. The summit continues this weekend with a film fest and 2 community conversations on Friday and Saturday. Details and schedule are hereImpact Films are here. Meanwhile, Comins talks with host Amy Hadden Marsh about ARE Day and climate change, and gives a little context to what the planet is currently experiencing.

On Friday, June 9, U.S. Senator Michael Bennet hosted three public town halls along the I-70 corridor. KDNK’s Gavin Dahl attended the final stop at the Glenwood Springs Public Library where local reporters were given a brief opportunity to speak with the Senator. The first question you’ll hear is from Aspen Daily News reporter Chad Abraham. The second question is Jim Williams of radio station KSNO. Click here to listen to the full hour of audio from U.S. Senator Michael Bennet’s Town Hall at the Glenwood Springs Library.

photo provided

Today’s guest is Marshall Saunders, founder of Citizens’ Climate Lobby. After a bout with cancer in 1985, Saunders, a former real estate developer, decided he wanted to do something with his life to help the world. Here, he talks about his dedication to a path of personal growth and its role in creating the results he has manifested by taking action, with love, on some big visions.

Gavin Dahl photo

Today's newscast features a conversation with Eagle County Commissioner Jill Ryan about the county's new Climate Action Plan.

On today's local newscast, Bente Birkeland reports that after a lengthy hearing, the proposal to create a religious freedom exemption bill in Colorado was defeated. Then Gavin Dahl interviews environmental reporter Bob Berwyn about his reporting on the impact of climate change in the Alps and his essay, Dear Skiers. Plus, Amy Hadden Marsh gets an update from Linda Black Elk, spokesperson for the Standing Rock water protectors. The Dakota Access Pipeline EIS is available on the Federal Register here.

Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron is one of three dozen mayors around the country to sign onto an open letter to Donald Trump calling for bold climate policy. KDNK news director spoke to City of Aspen Climate Action Manager Ashley Perl to learn more.

For this week’s news brief, award-winning investigative reporter and columnist Joel Dyer, editor of Boulder Weekly, says Donald Trump’s presidency could surprise people by galvanizing the environmental movement more than ever before. His cover story immediately after the election was “President Trump: How we got here and what to do now.”

On a new edition of Sounds of the High Country, KDNK News Director Gavin Dahl speaks to Aspen Ski Co's Auden Schendler. 

His editorial column "Some State Legislators Prefer Fantasy to Fact" was syndicated through their Writers on the Range series.