Interviews

New advances in technology may bring extinct species back to life

March 27, 2013
New advances in technology may bring extinct species back to life It's been almost 20 years since scientists cloned a sheep named Dolly, and since then, technological breakthroughs have made cloning more viable than ever before. And those breakthroughs have made it possible to consider reviving extinct plant and animal species like passenger pigeons and woolly mammoths.

In April's issue of National Geographic, science reporter and frequent Radiolab contributor Carl Zimmer writes about the scientific, ethical and conservation issues emerging from this new, groundbreaking field of science.

KDNK's Eric Skalac spoke to Zimmer to find out what's changed in the technology world to make this extraordinary field a reality.

(Zimmer had much more to say about de-extinction--including how some researchers in Korea and Siberia hope to clone the woolly mammoth, an animal who once played a vital role in the Siberian ecosystem. You can hear the full, unedited interview in our news archives.)
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Full unedited interview

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